Soave: Making a sensational comeback

Soave Italian white wine
In Italy, Soave is considered one of Italy’s leading white wines. Soave received its first real recognition in 1931 when it became one of the first of two areas to be recognized geographically delimited wine region for Italian white wine. Its popularity in Italy is immense, but in the United States in the 70s and 80s, it was most often associated with the cheaper quality wines that were mass-produced. Fast-forward several decades, and you will discover a considerable change in the quality and variety in styles of the Soave produced today.

The village of Soave is located in Northern Italy near Verona. Soave is primarily created from the Garganega grape. Sometimes Chardonnay and Trebbiano di Soave is blending in, but that is not the norm.

The Italian White Wine of Soave

The Italian White Wine of Soave

Soave DOC and DOCG

Soave was designated a DOC region in 1986. A separate Soave Superiore DOCG was created in 2001. Soave is made up of 13 municipalities and over 16,000 acres and is divided into the following three sub-regions. In addition to Soave DOC, there is the Soave Classico Doc and the Soave Colli Scaligen DOC.

Soave Soils

The soil compositions consist mostly of volcanic and found in the Eastern and Central portion of the region. Calcareous and limestone soils are found in the Southern and Western portions. These soils drive the flavors and profiles of the Soave. The volcanic soils produce a riper more viscous and richer wine, while those of the calcareous soils are floral, citric and refreshing with some chalkiness.

Soave Master Class

Recently the Soave Consorzio lead by Giovanni Ponchia joined with Master Sommelier Evan Goldstein visiting Los Angeles for a master class on Soave. The wine tasting promoted the merits and new face of Soave.

Giovanni Ponchia

Giovanni Ponchia

Italian White Wine Sampled

Highlights of the sensational Soave sampled.

Topping the list was the Latium Morini 2014 Soave, a blend of 80% Garganega and 20% Trebbiano di Soave. Coming from the western section of the Soave DOC, this wine delivered a softer and more delicate quality due to the chalky clay soils. The wine is bright, crisp, and refreshing, with flavors of grapefruit, citrus, and grass.

Latium Soave

Latium Soave

The 2014 Stefanini Soave comes from a newer vineyard, but the family has been making wine for a long time. The wine exhibits nutty flavors along with tropical fruit.

Stefanini Soave

Stefanini Soave

The 2013 Cantina Di Gambellara Soave Classico is a blend of 85% Garganega and 15% Trebbiano di Soave. Both the aromas and flavors are chalky with hints of melon and salt.

Coming from a more volcanic region, the 2011 Sandro De Bruno Soave Superiore is a wine you can hold for some time. This wine ferments in a large oak barrel bringing out the flavors of burnt caramel and brioche along with tropical fruit and banana. This wine is full-bodied.

Sandro de Bruno

Sandro de Bruno

Another 80/20 blend of Garganega and Trebbiano di Soave is the 2013 Soave Classico from Cantina del Castello. This wine is a light, refreshing Soave with crisp and bright citrus flavors.

More Soave Samples

Vicentini Agostino, located in that portion of Soave, known as the Valley of the Cherry, presented the 2012 Soave, a bigger and bolder with bright citrus flavors.

The 2007 Gini Soave Classico is an example of a Soave made with old vines and from a biodynamic winery. This elegant wine has a velvety quality with flavors of stone fruit and pears.

The 2013 Suavia Soave Monte Carbonare is a Soave Classico. The black stones present in the volcanic soil adds another dimension to the wine. Creamy and elegant, the wine has a woman winemakers touch to it.

Soave has come a long way, and it is worth discovering the refreshing qualities that make this Italian white wine the perfect summer fare.